Saints and Soldiers Image

We don’t do traditional T.V. in our home.  We have a television, but it isn’t hooked up to cable.  It isn’t even connected with traditional broadcast television channels.  It doesn’t have any channels; not a single one.  And it has been that way for the entire ten years we’ve been married.

Instead, we have a DVD player and a VCR.  We own some DVDs and VHS tapes, but not a lot.  In the past, we have actively chosen what we will watch by renting it from the local library or blockbuster.  If friends recommended a certain television show, we would wait for it to come out on DVD and then rent it.

Increasingly, however, our video entrainment is coming through the internet through sites like and

Last year I discovered that Hulu included the excellent LDS Film Saints and Soldiers among the feature films available to watch for free on their website.  A few months ago I noticed that it was listed among the most popular films for the day, and have been watching its popularity ever since.

Saints and Soldiers is currently the 2nd most popular feature film of all time on Hulu (behind the Jim Carey movie Liar Liar).  It is also the 4th most popular film this month,  the 7th most popular film this week,  and the 12th most popular film today.

It has been consistently on the  first page of the list most popular films on Hulu for months and has 512 reviews. It is also listed among the highest rated feature films on the site.

While there are quite a few LDS themed films that I would not recommend, I wonder if the producers of some of the better LDS movies have considered trying to get their movies on Hulu to be watched for free with advertsing?  It seems like a great way to make their works available to a wider audience, both LDS and Non-LDS.

In any case, if you haven’t seen Saints and Soldiers, I highly recommend it, with the warning that it is quite violent and rated PG-13 for content that some familes might find objectionable.  You can watch it for free on Hulu over a broadband internet connection:

Saints and Soldiers (1 hour 30 minutes)

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